Japanese American Internment and Census Talking Points

The issue of the Japanese American internment during World War II, and the role that census data played in the internment, keeps resurfacing. It came to light that the Census Bureau shared information about where Japanese Americans resided in the country during World War II when the laws protecting census data were not as strong as they are today. We learned many lessons from our experiences during World War II and steps have been taken to ensure this would not happen again.  Here are some talking points about the Japanese American Internment and Census 2010:

  • Title 13, the federal law that protects census data, was strengthened in part due to this incident during World War II.
  • When the fact about the sharing of the data came to light during the 2000 census, then-Census Bureau Director Dr. Ken Prewitt subsequently issued an apology on behalf of the Census Bureau and noted important safeguards were put into place by the government to preclude a repeat of such a “sad, shameful event in American history.”
  • The Census Bureau holds its privacy and confidentiality obligations as one of their most important missions because it recognizes that the accuracy of the census is dependent on the public’s trust in the safety of their data.
  • Census responses are confidential and protected by the strongest privacy laws in this nation.
  • The reality is that no other government agency – not even law enforcement or the courts – can get any person's individual census information for 72 years.
  • No other law or agency can override protections for the confidentiality of people's responses to census questions – not the Patriot Act, the IRS, Homeland Security, or ICE.
  • The U.S. Department of Justice has issued a statement declaring that no other law – not even the PATRIOT Act – overrides the confidentiality of the census.
  • No private company, landlord or employer can get any household's census information, even with a court order.
  • Every census worker has to swear an oath to keep information confidential for life. If they violate that oath they face large fines and jail time.
  • There's no need to fear the census. Individual information is safe and your privacy is strongly protected.

Be the first to know

Contest of the Month - Win a Netbook!

Contest of the Month - Win a Netbook!

Share your thoughts about the importance of the census to our community and enter a chance to win a Netbook! Answer this question: "Starting May 1 through early summer, census takers will be going to households that did not mail back a form to complete the census form. What do you plan on doing to help educate the community, your family, and friends that this process is continuing and they need to talk to the census taker so that they can complete their census form?"

Winner of the Wii is...

The winner is of our drawing of the Wii from last month's entries is Alofa Taliva'a from San Jose, CA. Read what the Census means to Alofa.

2010 Census Participation Rates

2010 Census Participation Rates

Learn how your if your own neighborhood is doing what it can to secure the resources you deserve for your community by being counted. To find your area's 2010 Census participation rate using the map, enter your zip code, or your city and state, in the search field and click the “Find” button. Once you do this, a national view of the map will appear with a data window on the exact location you chose. The mail participation rate for that area will be featured prominently within that window.

Watch the Video and Take the Pledge!

Watch the Video and Take the Pledge!

The 2010 Census survey forms are coming to your family's mail boxes. Now is your chance to let the government know how you want your taxpayer dollars to be spent. Watch this fun video to find out why filling out the Census survey and returning it by April 1 is so important. TAKE THE PLEDGE! Now available in English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Laotian, Hmong, Hindi, Tongan, and Samoan.

Fill In Our Future Census 2010 Brochure

Fill In Our Future Census 2010 Brochure

This newly developed brochure provides information on the importance of filling out the 2010 Census, answers to some frequently asked questions, and a timeline on Census 2010 activities to promote and encourage census response rates for Asian Americans. It will be provided in over 25 Asian and Pacific Islander languages. Check back here in a week for all other translations.

What's important today

  1. *** Rep. Mike Honda (D-Calif.) talks about how California will lose funding due to low census response rates.
  2. *** The percentage of households that have mailed back their Census forms could top the 2000 response rate — a major accomplishment in the face of growing suspicion of government, swelling population and increased diversity.
  3. *** Engage Her, a national organization that educates and activates multicultural communities for leadership roles and civic engagement, is offering an iPod Touch as a prize asking people to Text "FREECENSUS" to...
  4. *** When she fills out her 2010 Census form this week, Mei-Ling Malone is looking forward to answering Question #9 ― “the race question.” She’s adamant about documenting her multiracial background. Malone, who studied multiracial politics at UC Irvine and is now pursuing a doctorate at UCLA, has an African-American father and a Taiwanese mother. For Malone, 26, this is her first opportunity to respond to a census and possibly provide a different answer to the race question than what her parents may have noted for her 10 years ago
  5. *** With Census Day, April 1, rapidly approaching, AAJC is pleased with Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano’s recent promise that immigration enforcement will not hinder Census 2010. And for her commitment to maintaining the integrity of the information it collects.
  6. *** A massive outreach effort is underway in Chinatown to inform residents about the importance of filling out the 2010 U.S. Census form. NY1's Rebecca Spitz filed the following report.
  7. *** Call our Telephone Questionnaire Assistance Center or visit our Questionnaire Assistance Center and Be Counted sites. Download a Language Assistance Guide.
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